Free MFT Exam Practice Question: Anxiety Disorders

By Asya Mourraille on June 24, 2019

This week, our free MFT Clinical exam practice question is going to focus on the topic of anxiety disorders. Most of us have worked with individuals diagnosed with some form of these DSM diagnoses. This will be extremely helpful during the exam. Most of us can also relate to having experiencing anxiety here and there, too.  Regardless of how much or how little you already know about this subject, the Therapist Development Center’s exam prep will ensure you know everything need to correctly answer questions on this topic. 

 

How might this topic be tested?

Whether you are taking the California MFT Clinical Exam or the National MFT Exam, there are several ways in which anxiety disorders could be tested.  Questions on either exam could test your ability to:

  • Diagnose anxiety disorders
  • Differentiate anxiety diagnoses from each other
  • Develop an appropriate treatment plan
  • Know expression of diagnoses across the lifespan
  • Be familiar with various medications used to treat these disorders
  • Be aware of proper referrals and coordination of care

Let’s see how you do on this week’s FREE MFT Clinical exam practice question.

 

Practice Question on Anxiety Disorders:

A therapist meets with a 29-year-old software engineer. The client is diagnosed with Generalized Anxiety Disorder.  In addition, he has a history of addiction to cocaine and alcohol. He states that he has been using these substances for the most part of his twenties, but was able to stop on his own early last year. He is not open to attending a twelve step program due to his perceived stigma associated with it. The client also states that his job can be very demanding and draining, and he is afraid of relapsing during periods of high stress and anxiety. As part of the treatment plan the therapist should focus on:

A. Helping the client develop alternative coping mechanisms to deal with stress and anxiety

     Expanding the client’s understanding of cognitive, physiological and behavioral components   of anxiety and addiction

    Replacing fearful self-talk with realistic and empowering self-talk

B. Identifying social supports available to the client

    Expanding the client’s understanding of cognitive, physiological and behavioral components   of anxiety and addiction

    Replacing fearful self-talk with realistic and empowering self-talk

C. Evaluating client’s motivation for treatment. 

    Identifying situations, thoughts and feelings associated with anxiety and cravings

    Developing client’s understanding of co-occurring mental health issue

D. Discussing professional consequences of client’s substance use

    Identifying situations, thoughts and feelings associated with anxiety and cravings

    Developing client’s understanding of co-occurring mental health issues

(correct answer and rationale below)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 The correct answer is A.

 

  • The best answer here is A. In the stem the client clearly expresses fear of relapsing during times of stress. Thus, developing alternative coping mechanisms as part of the treatment goal would directly address this concern. The other two goals fall in line with the client’s diagnosis of Generalized Anxiety Disorder and his noted history of addiction. 
  • Answer B could be tempting; however, there is no mention in the stem regarding the presence of or lack of social supports. Plus, this answer does not directly address the fear of relapse expressed by the client. Thus, it is not as strong of an answer option as A. 
  • Answer C highlights evaluating client’s motivation, which is not mentioned in the stem as a concern. In fact, the client appears to be motivated. He does not mention resistance to therapy or lack of motivation. , This answer does  not relate back to information shared in the stem as do all components of answer A. 
  • The first part of answer D is an intervention, but we have to come up with goals based on the question that is asked. This answer, therefore, can also be eliminated. 

 

To learn all about the intricacies of anxiety disorders, sign up for one of TDC’s MFT exam study guides to help you prepare for your exam today! Amanda Rowan has helped thousands of Marriage and Family Therapists pass their MFT exams-are you our next success story?


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One Response to “Free MFT Exam Practice Question: Anxiety Disorders”

  1. Phil H.

    The question stem is very true to reality , in fact I worked with a client with very similar Sx in real life. As a certified Addiciton Counselor I’m guessing Answer A is designed to be a “best of the worst”. My concern is the wording: “replacing fearful self-talk with realistic and empowering self-talk” as a treatment strategy with an client with addiction diagnosis falls short of a behaviorially alligned goal. In my thinking I had ruled out options A & B specifically because empowering thoughts don’t stand a chance against the biological cravings of priming brain biology. In conclusion I really liked the question but the answer choices were all really weak.

    Reply

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